7 Inspiring Biographies That New Writers Should Read

Many people don't like to read biographies at all. However, we feel that biographies offer both life lessons and writing lessons that every new writer should read. The list below is biographies that we'd recommend.

1. A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway
How to be a writer during early 1900s? Ernest Hemingway answered this question in his autobiography, A Moveable Feast. In his memoir, he emphasized the streets, cafes and bookshop as significant places in the city of early Paris that witnessed his struggled as a young poor writer. He also featured other artists and writers both destined to fame and to failure as part of the rewards and consequences of the writers' life. Anyhow, these obstacles he surpassed, according to him, honed his skills in writing molded him into the person he is.

2. The Autobiography of Malcolm X as told by Alex Haley by Malcolm X
Centuries have passed and the endless conflict between the whites and black still exists until today. In his autobiography written by Haley, Malcolm X, the “spiritual father of the Black Power movement,” devoted his life in fighting for the rights and freedom of the African American during the early centuries. He is known for his separatism and militancy which are against the tactics of the famous Martin Luther King.

3. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King
Stephen King's memoir shows how powerful writing can be as a tool for his recovery from an illness just like what happened to King. In 1999, he began to write about his childhood and his passion to write to narrate a story. In the next years, he published his novel, Carrie, as a product of his adolescence and his struggles as part of the process of his formation as a writer. Time passed, and he focused on writing about the life of a writer from work habits up to rejection. King offers pieces of practical and inspiring advice beneficial for young writers.

4. The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
Nothing is more dramatic than reading a diary of a young girl in the midst of war, famine and danger. This heartwarming and very innocent account of Anne Frank provides accurate perspective on the life during the regime of the German empire. Full of horror, Anne Frank writes in a number of days about the story of her family and her experiences and aspirations as a young innocent girl.

5. The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin, known more as the $100 man, is actually a political and scientific figure. In spite that he is involved politics, he focused more on writing as a Renaissance scholar. It is manifested in his memoir by emphasizing the love of learning and seeking for ways to help humanity to achieve better kind of life.

6. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou's autobiography is filled with the struggles and success of a southern black girl in which she tackled the specific issues of racial and gender discrimination and relationships between parents and children and child abuse. Angelou's story is inspiring to everyone searching to find themselves and aiming to achieve what he or she deserves because Maya Angelou's autobiography showcases the grandeur of a life resilient to criticisms of the society.

7. The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
Nothing can stop a person driven by burning passion and determination to leave out of the box. That is what Helen Keller, both deaf and blind, achieved after her beloved teacher Anne Sullivan. The biography of Keller features her life from a silent and dark childhood to successful advocate and activist for the person with disabilities and experiences inequalities.